Thursday, 19 September 2013

Burda of the month: 8/2013#106 red wool crepe jacket

It's becoming a bit of a habit of mine to finish my Burda projects in the following month instead of the month of issue as I originally vowed to myself - but I'm getting them made and that's all that counts. Plus this month I made a rather involved project instead of something simple, and lo and behold it's not a dress for a change!


Yes that's right - I made a tailored jacket. It's jacket #106 from the 8/2013 issue which looks like this in the magazine:


I admit that I may have been more than a little bit influenced by the magazine photo, but I've had a beautiful piece of raspberry red wool crepe in my stash for a while just waiting for the perfect project which turns out to be this pattern.

This pattern is the illustrated step-by-step guide for the month. Confusingly the page says it's both easy sewing and a "sewing lesson for the advanced" - although now that I've completed it I realise that what they meant was that it's an advanced pattern that they show you how to make in the most basic (but not best) manner to make it easy. I did read the instructions, and they were helpful to figure out the collar construction but mostly I did it my own way from experience and other resources.


Here's what I did differently to the pattern instructions:

1. Used way more interfacing than suggested. The pattern calls for interfacing only on the front facing piece, collar and hem lines, but I chose to block interface all my fabric pieces with a light weight interfacing, and then put an extra layer on the collar and front inset piece for extra stiffness. This gave the crepe a bit more substantial body appropriate to a jacket, although I suppose if you were using a fabric that was more substantial to begin with it wouldn't be needed.

2. I used the organza patch method to finish the back of the inseam buttonhole. Burda gives instructions to cut a slit in the fabric, turn under the edges and hand sew. Instead I used the method described in the Vogue Sewing book to use a square of organza to make an opening that you would use on the back of a bound buttonhole - it looks neater than the hand stitching I could achieve and is less likely to fray.




3. I bagged the lining instead of hand slip stitching the lining down at the end. I don't know why Burda didn't recommend this method - it's much a quicker and neater method and isn't really that difficult. The first time you do a bagged lining you don't think it could possibly work but it does! I like this tutorial over at Grainline Studio which clearly shows how it all comes together. For my lining I used a pink polyester of some sort that has been in the stash for years - one side is a soft, furry feeling which I used as the wrong side and the other has a slight ribbed texture that is more slippery - I have no idea what it is but it's a nice enough colour match with the raspberry red.


4. In addition to the suggested shoulder pads, I added a sleeve head cut from some wool melton to support the top of the sleeve as recommended in many tailoring books. It's the first time I've done this, but I do think it's made a difference - the sleeve sits so nicely. I also narrowed the shoulder by 2.5cm which is my usual adjustment.



Apart from the shoulder adjustment I made no alterations to the pattern which I cut out using the smallest size, size 34. Of course it's not perfect, but since I didn't make a muslin what can I expect? If I make this again I would take out a small wedge of the centre front panel because I'm rather flat chested and this bit sticks out a bit from my chest.

But overall I really love this jacket and am glad I put in the effort to make it properly. I made a fabric covered button because I couldn't find a perfect match, which I think looks quite smart. And the best thing is that the jacket sits equally well open or closed:



So well done Burda - a lovely pattern and well drafted. I'm actually thinking of making an evening version of this jacket in a tuxedo style in black satin with a matte finish for those front inset panels. I'll just add that to my very long to do list!

97 comments:

  1. What a lovely jacket and it suits you perfectly too. It looks extremely well tailored and you've inspired me to make one myself since I subscribe to Burda and really don't always notice every design, there are so many. The dress you are wearing is great, is that one of your makes?

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    1. Thank you. The dress is one of my makes, another Burda pattern actually - 10/09 # 119. I posted it here: http://loweryourpresserfoot.blogspot.com.au/2010/04/something-new-not-ufo-for-change.html

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  2. Oh wow! This looks so sharp and those bound button holes are rad!

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    1. Thanks - the extra effort for the buttonholes was worth it (I don't usually bother with those little details though!)

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  3. Beautiful sewing! And it's perfect with the dress you are wearing!

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    1. Thanks! I was worried that I would have nothing to wear with a red jacket but it turns out there are few things in my wardrobe (phew!)

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  4. This is a stunning jacket, it looks beautiful on you.

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  5. Amazing jacket! I love the colour.

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    1. Thanks! It's not usually a colour I wear but it turns out I quite like wearing red

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  6. That looks great, and I love the color too!

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  7. Your jacket looks lovely. I bought the August 2013 Burda just for that pattern, now to get around to it!

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    1. I hope you do - it is a great pattern and a useful addition to the wardrobe

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  8. This truly looks lovely - the jacket itself and on you. Very nicely done!!! I am in awe that you can accomplish so much with two children.

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    1. If you saw the state of my house and the pile of clean washing to be put away you wouldn't be in awe ha ha ha! But we're all happy (including me) so that's more important.

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  9. That's a beautiful jacket and it looks like a very expensive tailored jacket. The color is really lovely and the jacket looks great on you! Well done!!

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  10. Beautiful! You should definitely make this again!

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    1. I definitely will make this again - in fact I'm wondering how many versions I can get away with making before it looks like a uniform

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  11. This jacket turned out so well! It looks very professional and expensive. Beautiful!

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  12. That IS stunning and the tuxedo version sounds amazing too.

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    1. Thanks! I'm searching for the right double sided fabric to make a tuxedo version - a good reason for fabric shopping

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  13. Great jacket! Well made, beautiful color. Great style for you.

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  14. Beautiful! I also tried using a sleeve head for the first time on my last jacket. It makes all the difference.

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    1. I am amazed at how much difference that one little bit of fabric made to the sleeve - I'll definitely be using it from now on when I make jackets

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  15. Well done! It looks lovely on also... you mentioned that you would change it up as far as the bodice area... it looks great to me... we are our own worst critics you know! Love the color too!
    Yeah, one less in the stash!

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    1. Thanks Jean. I know I'm always critical of myself, but really it's just so I know what to fix to make it absolutely perfect next time

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  16. Beautifully done! I really love your pictures, too.

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    1. Thanks Katie - I have been trying to improve my photography so I'm glad you like the photos

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  17. This looks really sleek! I have made so few jackets that I would be totally reliant on the instructions. I have yet to fully bag a jacket, so thanks for the link to Jen's tutorial.

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    1. I haven't made too many successful jackets but I think Burda is more of a hindrance sometimes with their convoluted instructions

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  18. All the appropriate adjectives have been taken, so I'll repeat: beautiful!

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    1. And I'm running out of adjectives to say thanks!

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  19. Simple, classic, timeless and so flattering on you.
    I would love to see your next version of this as well!

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    1. Now I've put it out there that I'm going to do another version I'll have to deliver the goods... So many projects, so little time

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  20. Definitely worth the effort - lovely work Kris. The shoulders look immaculate.

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    1. Thanks Christy - shoulders are usually my achilles heel so I'm glad they turned out well

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  21. Wow, I love everything about this jacket: the proportions, style, color, your skills, everything! Congratulations and I hope that you get many many many happy hours of wear from it. Enjoy!

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    1. Thanks Sandra - I've already worn it to work twice so I'm sure it'll get worn lots in the future

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  22. Great jacket! I have been eyeing off this pattern so thanks for the detailed review.

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    1. Thanks Sue - hope they help when you make your jacket

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  23. What a fabulous jacket. Love the colour. The style suits you. Great job.

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  24. What a classy jacket - lovely on you, and the shoulders look perfect! Based on your success I'm going to have to try making a sleeve head on my next jacket...

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    1. Thanks Gabrielle - the sleeve head only took a few minutes to do but made such a difference

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  25. That is one elegant and stylish jacket. I have found fabric that I really love and that has been in my stash for a looong time tells me what it wants to be when it is ready to move on. Of course it's not perfect, you say. But is that just in the static pose for the photo. I am sure once you are moving around all those 'imperfect' parts just disappear. And don't knock flat-chested-ness, which you really aren't. Those who are more well endowed have their own problems. You have every reason to be happy with your jacket!!

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    1. Thanks Renata - as usual you give words of wisdom! I agree we all have fitting issues, and I suppose mine are easier to fix than doing a FBA

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  26. what a wonderful jacket - you look great in it, and elegant

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  27. Gorgeous jacket and it looks fabulous on you. Thank you for the detailed review as this one has definitely been on my to do list!

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    1. Well now you've knocked over that trench coat I'm sure you're up for making another jacket right?!

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  28. I love your jacket. It has all the elements to make it long wearing and chic. You picked a great style Kristy!

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    1. Thanks Maria, I hope the fabric is durable because I do see myself wearing this for a long time

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  29. It's fantastic!!! And it's very well done, so profesional. Congrats

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  30. What a lovely jacket. I really suits you and it's a very nice design. Thanks for all the construction details. I just cut a test denim jacket last night so will be using these tips very soon. I am curious about sizing. You mention you chose a 34...was there loads of ease or...?

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    1. Thanks Silvia. There wasn't an excessive amount of ease in the pattern, it sits nicely over a shirt but isn't too big over a close fitting knit either. I just need a small size for my narrow shoulders but it seems a bit long across the front

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  31. Beautifully crafted! Or I should say tailored. *^v^* Thank you for all the technical details, I like the idea of adding additional piece of wool to your sleeve head, I didn't know about it. Am I right that you placed the button in a different place than in the pattern? The drawing and the Burda's photo show the button on the left side and yours is in the centre.

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    1. You're right - I hadn't noticed until now that I put the button in a different place. That may explain why the jacket sticks out a bit at the front when buttoned up!

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  32. You've certainly come a long way with jackets. It's beautiful - I think I will put this on my to make list as well. The buttonhole is very neat. Putting something in the sleeve head does help - I often use seam roll in the sleeve head (haven't made a jacket for a few years, so you are tempting me to get started on one in the future :)

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    1. Thanks Sarah - I'm tempted to go back and fix some of my earlier jackets which are no where near as good as this one!

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  33. Gorgeous jacket Kristy, and thanks for the link to the lining tutorial. A jacket is on my list of 2013 must-sews (after Spotlight accidentally sold me a Vogue pattern for $5). And it's September already!

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    1. Spotlight accidentally sold me a few Vogue patterns too!

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  34. Really beautiful jacket Kristy. I love the colour and it does sit very nicely open and closed. I loved that suit when I saw it and it looks at least as good on you as it does on the model.

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    1. thanks - I'm tempted to make a matching skirt or pants to do a copy cat suit

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  35. Well this is fabulous!! It's the holy grail for me to get a shoulder that looks like what you've got here - it's beautiful. You fabric (and block interfacing) lends itself really well to this pattern - looks great!

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    1. Perfect shoulders have always been my holy grail too. I'll have to find something else to nitpick and conquer now

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  36. Love the jacket, it is made so well!

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  37. Your version is even prettier than the Burda iteration. Congratulations on a great job!

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  38. Lovely job - I really liked this jacket in this issue, the lines are gorgeous but not distracting.

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    1. thanks Lizzy - it did seem quite refined for Burda

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  39. You've done a beautiful job on your new jacket.

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  40. Well done. You have sewn this jacket beautifully and fits you so well. I am sure you will have given many of us who buy Burda the courage to give this a go. Thank-you for the extra interfacing advice. I have made several Burda jackets over the years and thought their interfacing instructions were a bit lean. I hope you make this again in an evening fabric as I think this would work really well with an evening dress.

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    1. Thanks Marjorie. I've come to realise that the lack of interfacing has probably been the reason for many of my projects looking less than professional

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  41. Lovely jacket, it fits you perfectly! I picked this out to to sew as I love the simple lines (and since it was the illustrated pattern maybe I could actually make it LOL). Thanks for the excellent review of the pattern and the helpful tips!

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    1. I'm sure you could make it - the illustrated pattern instructions are helpful, it's just that there are more things that could be done to make it a little better

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  42. Wow, I would have thought this jacket was stolen from Burda if I hadn't seen the construction photos! Thanks for a very useful review, which I will refer to when I make my own version of this. Yours looks fantastic!

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    1. Thanks Megan - I hope my additions to the pattern instructions are helpful

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  43. Wow Kristy, this jacket is gorgeous! I'm amazed that you just whipped up a tailored, fully lined jacket with no fuss whatsoever. Well done. : ) Wear your new jacket with pride - it's fabulous!

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    1. Well I wouldn't say 'whipped up' but thank you anyway!

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  44. It looks amazing on you. Well done and thankyou for sharing your tips and methods. The colour is fab too.

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  45. Thanks Kim, I'm trying to be more bold in my colour choices instead of wearing boring corporate colours all the time...

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  46. You make so many nice things, but this one is just superb! It looks so professionally made, and it compliments you so well! I think a black tuxedo version would be amazing, too. Well done and thanks for sharing!

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  47. Perfect jacket. I was thinking about making one for myself, now I know I must have it! It really looks well tailored - good job Burda.

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  48. I have just come across this blog entry because I am about to embark on making that same jacket- but in boring black. I am a novice at jackets and also with Burda patterns. I selected size 36 to trace off as I am a 84 cm bust but most of my measurements are slightly less than those given in the Burda Size Chart in the magazine. I am making a toile and have just started to pin the toile together but find the centre front piece is about 5 cm longer than necessary to fit to the side front piece. I checked again against the pattern piece but I had traced it correctly. Did you find this? I also do not have an ample or even average bosom- I just about fit an A cup if I can get the right bra- do you think I will need to do much alteration? P.S. Your jacket looks fantastic, only hope mine will look half as good.

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    1. Blush of shame! I think I've worked out why the piece is longer, having tried on the toile, minus sleeves- I think I have put one piece in the wrong way round! Otherwise it seems to be fitting quite well.

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  49. So glad I found your blog post! I'm in the process of making this jacket. I bought the pattern off of Burdastyle's website and I always find their instructions so hard to understand. You may find an email from me if I get in a jam. Your jacket has turned out lovely!!!

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  50. i am just about to make this jacket and love the look of yours. Did you feel it was the right length, in the Burda pics it looks very short but it is just right on you.

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